Squash Scheme of Work for Primary Schools (Years 1-6)

Squash primary

Squash Scheme of Work Overview

The aim of this resource is to provide a clear framework which teachers and other physical education and school sport professionals can use to develop squash in primary schools. It provides detailed schemes of work and lesson plans which primary colleagues will find invaluable. It links effectively to the current National Curriculum (Key Stage 1 and 2) and provides challenging activities. It strengthens the link between school and extra-curricular activities and competition and there is also focus on literacy and key words which lends itself to cross curricular activities.

It is extremely important to understand that this resource is simply a guide and as the user, lesson plans do not need to be followed exactly. When using it, you may find that you will achieve more or less than the suggested content in each unit of work, this is of course dependent on timings allocated for Physical Education at your school as well as the need for adaptation and differentiation. You will have to take into account that each pupil has their own individual needs, and different ability levels as well as different experiences with regards to physical education and sport, therefore those using it should consider how to differentiate tasks so that all pupils are included and are able to meet the learning objectives and outcomes with some degree of success.

Introduction

Mini Squash is the UK approved programme for children aged 5 to 11 years (school years 1-6) and offers an ideal introduction to the game of squash, based on the fundamental movement skills of agility (A), balance (B) and co-ordination (C) known collectively as the ABCs.  The exciting and fun game of Mini Squash fits the needs of younger children using specially adapted equipment for the school hall and club environment.

Popular thinking indicates that before the age of 10, children are most receptive to learning the fundamental movement skills of agility (jumping, running, and fast feet), balance (using the centre of gravity and the base of support), and co-ordination; throwing and catching, (and using a racket). All of these skills are essential for the long term development of the athlete (LTAD) and form the basis of the activities and games in relation to Mini Squash within this resource.

Mini Squash covers every element of the initial stages of a child’s long-term squash development and is designed to enable every child to be included in maximising their individual potential.

Mini Squash also provides the vital curriculum link for teachers and coaches incorporating essential educational outcomes within the activities and games described in this resource, which is both flexible (for differentiation, easier or harder etc), easy to follow and mostly important good fun!

Level
Age Range
Rackets & Balls
FUN 1-6 Ages 5 to 7 years depending on ability
  • FUN racket or a mini-sized squash racket
  • FUN ball
PLAY 1-6 Age 7 & upwards depending on ability
  • PLAY racket or a junior-sized squash racket
  • PLAY ball
COMPETE 1-7 Age 8 & upwards depending on ability
  • COMPETE racket or a full-sized squash racket
  • COMPETE ball

Mini Squash is split into three levels which are colour coded to define the different levels of progressions – FUN, PLAY & COMPETE. This provides teachers and coaches with a clear direction as to the most appropriate way to meet the needs of the younger developing player.  FUN is the starting point, followed by PLAY and then COMPETE as the top level for Mini Squash.

This resource deals exclusively with the first FUN level of Mini Squash for school years 1-6 (Key Stage 1 and 2), and is designed to maximise the ease of performance of the activities and games contained within.  Obviously there is scope to make these activities easier or harder to cater for different ability levels, but still has a strong element of competition to inspire and enthuse.  It is also intended that schools utilising this resource will look to compete in ‘school families’ or ‘partnership clusters’, with teams from years 4-6 culminating in a District/Regional final and ideally a nearby club-based coaching programme as a follow on.

The National Schools Squash Schemes of Work resource supports the Key Stage 1 and 2 Physical Education Programme of Study that is delivered in the Primary Curriculum. For Key Stage 1, sessions focus on the idea that pupils build on their natural enthusiasm for movement, using it to explore and learn about their environment. Practices are in place to allow pupils to start working and playing with others in pairs and small groups. By watching, listening and experimenting, pupils will develop their skills in movement and coordination, and enjoy expressing and testing themselves in a variety of situations.

Throughout Key Stage 1, this resource will focus on knowledge, skills and understanding. Teaching should ensure that when evaluating and improving performance, connections are made between developing, selecting and applying skills, tactics and compositional ideas, and fitness and health.

Physical Education Programme of Study – Key Stage 1:

Acquiring and developing skills

1. Pupils should be taught to:

a) explore basic skills, actions and ideas with increasing understanding

b) remember and repeat simple skills and actions with increasing control and coordination.

Selecting and applying skills, tactics and compositional ideas

2. Pupils should be taught to:

a) explore how to choose and apply skills and actions in sequence and in combination

b) vary the way they perform skills by using simple tactics and movement phrases

c) apply rules and conventions for different activities.

Evaluating and improving performance

3. Pupils should be taught to:

a) describe what they have done

b) observe, describe and copy what others have done

c) use what they have learnt to improve the quality and control of their work.

Knowledge and understanding of fitness and health

4. Pupils should be taught:

a) how important it is to be active

b) to recognise and describe how their bodies feel during different activities

During Key Stage 2 pupils enjoy being active and using their creativity and imagination in physical activity. Using this resource will aim to help them to learn new skills, find out how to use them in different ways, and link them to make actions, phrases and sequences of movement. At this level, they enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other. They develop an understanding of how to succeed in different activities and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.

Physical Education Programme of Study – Key Stage 2:

Acquiring and developing skills

1. Pupils should be taught to:

a) consolidate their existing skills and gain new ones

b) perform actions and skills with more consistent control and quality.

Selecting and applying skills, tactics and compositional ideas

2. Pupils should be taught to:

a) plan, use and adapt strategies, tactics and compositional ideas for individual, pair, small-group and small-team activities

b) develop and use their knowledge of the principles behind the strategies, tactics and ideas to improve their effectiveness

c) apply rules and conventions for different activities.

Evaluating and improving performance

3. Pupils should be taught to:

a) identify what makes a performance effective

b) suggest improvements based on this information.

Knowledge and understanding of fitness and health

4. Pupils should be taught:

a) how exercise affects the body in the short term

b) to warm up and prepare appropriately for different activities

c) why physical activity is good for their health and well-being

d) why wearing appropriate clothing and being hygienic is good for their health and safety.

The resource has been created and adapted to focus on two out of the four main areas of study in Physical Education. The two areas are acquiring and developing skills and the selecting and applying skills, tactics and compositional ideas.

Download Squash Scheme of Work

  • Microsoft Word Version – Here
  • PDF Version – Here

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